Emelia Wilmot is a professional assistance dog trainer living in the north/west region of Melbourne, Victoria and a lifelong lover of dogs.
Emelia completed her certificate IV in Companion animal services at Hanrob Dog Training Academy, 2016 and an Approved Trainer under the Queensland Guide Hearing and Assistance Dogs Act 2009.

As well as the diverse music therapy positions including: Adolescent and adult mental health, palliative care, Autism/special education, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), women's & children's refuge, aged care, acquired brain injury and stroke rehabilitation; Emelia's main interest is training service dogs to gain their Public Access Test (PAT) for adults living with various disabilities including PTSD.

If you have a certified disability and think you may benefit from an assistance dog, please get in touch.

Taken from Victoria State Government Website: 'Assistance Dogs'
http://agriculture.vic.gov.au/pets/dogs/guide-dogs-and-seeing-eye-dogs

"The Equal Opportunity Act 2010 (the Act) protects people with disabilities from discrimination. This includes protection from discrimination because a person has an assistance dog.

Assistance dogs can play a significant role in increasing the independence of people with a range of disabilities.

Employers, goods and service providers and others, must not discriminate against someone because they have an assistance dog. This means that a person with an assistance dog must generally be allowed onto transport and into cafes and restaurants.

In August 2011, this protection was expanded from guide dogs working with people who have visual impairments to all assistance dogs. 'Assistance dog' is any dog that is trained to perform tasks or functions that help a person with a disability to alleviate the effects of the disability. This includes dogs trained to pick things up for people with mobility disabilities, and dogs trained to assist people who have seizures.

The Act specifically says that it is unlawful to refuse to provide accommodation to a person with a disability because they have an assistance dog. You also can't charge the person extra or ask them to keep the assistance dog somewhere else.   The Act doesn't apply this protection to other types of companion animals".

* If you are looking into NDIS funding for your Assistance Dog, please read the article in this link:

www.ndis.gov.au/medias/documents/hf5/hc0/8799673090078/Assistance-Animals-PDF-1-MB-.pdf.

Emelia lives with her partner and two beautiful kelpies that assist her with life in general.
Please contact Emelia via email or phone to inquire further.
emeliawilmot@gmail.com
Ph: 0414 477 772.